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Useful Information

IMPORTANT NOTES

SINGLE SUPPLEMENT

A Single Supplement to have your own room is available in all our trips however excludes the nights that you will be Camping, Homestay's and Amazon where you will be in shared accommodation subject to availability.

INCA TRAIL PERMITS.

For the Inca Trail you most booked at least 7 or 8 months in advance to get the permit. For other tours, ROLO’S TRAVEL PERU recommends you book one month in advance, however, depending on availability, we can accommodate a booking two weeks in advance. 
Inca Trail permits are sold on request basis only. Once deposit is paid and passport details provided, Rolo’s Travel Peru will endeavour to secure a permit for you.

If Inca Trail permits are unavailable by the time you book, you can opt to hike the Inca Quarry Trail instead as alternative.

The Inca Trail closes in February to allow cleaning and restoration works. If the trek portion of your trip starts in February you will be automatically booked to hike the Inca Quarry Trail.

Should you choose not to hike at all, please let us know in writing at the time of booking so alternative arrangements can be made? Without this prior warning, local fees may apply.

PASSPORT DETAILS REQUIRED
Full passport details are required at the time of booking in order to purchase the permit of the Inca Trail and entrance fees to important sites such as Machu Picchu. Delays to provide this information may result in booking fees or changes to your itinerary.

INCA TRAIL OR OTHER TREKS.

While hiking the 4 Day Inca Trail or any other of our treks you may join with some other travelers while beginning the trek to complement the group size.
On June 30th Peruvian authorities released a new list of regulations for visiting Machu Picchu, which came into effect from July 1st. The main points impacting our visits are:

  1. There is now a time limit to visit the citadel. Morning visitors must exit the site by 12pm and afternoon visitors by 4.30pm
  2. Visitors must complete a designated circuit, in one direction only. Exiting and re-entering the site is not permitted and, upon completion, visitor must exit the site. There is no allowance for personal exploration of the site any longer.

Overall we support these changes as they help preserve this invaluable archaeological site. While this somehow restricts the amount of time we are now allowed to spend in Machu Picchu, we’ll do all possible to maximise your time there and make sure you have the best possible experience.

PASSPORT AND VISAS.

PASSPORT:
Your passport details are required to complete your booking. Please ensure the name on your passport matches the name on your booking and airline tickets. As a general rule most countries expect that your passport has a minimum of 6 months' validity remaining. Take a copy of the main passport pages and other important documents with you, and leave another copy at home with family or friends.

VISAS:
Visas are the responsibility of the individual traveller. The below country specific information was correct at time of writing, however please visit the relevant consular website of the country or countries you’re visiting for detailed and up-to-date visa information specific to your nationality. Visas can take several weeks to process, so familiarise yourself with any requirements as soon as you have booked your trip to allow for processing time. Also remember to check whether a transit visa is required on route to join this trip or on the way home.
If you receive an immigration card upon entry, please ensure you keep this safe as it may be requested at point of exit. For further information regarding country entry and exit fees, please refer to the 'Money Matters' section of this document. 

MEDICAL AND HEALTH INFORMATION 
All Rolo’s Travel Peru travellers need to be in good physical health in order to participate fully on this trip. When selecting your trip please make sure you have read through the itinerary carefully and assess your ability to cope with our style of travel. Please note that if, in the opinion of our group leader or local guide, any traveller is unable to complete the itinerary without undue risk to themselves and/or the rest of the group, Rolo’s Travel peru, travels reserves the right to exclude them from all or part of a trip without refund.
You should consult your doctor for up-to-date medical travel information or for any necessary vaccinations and anti-malarial requirements before departure. We recommend that you carry a first aid kit as well as any personal medical requirements (including a spare pair of glasses) as they may not easily be obtained at the locations of the trip. For legal reasons our leaders and guides are prohibited from administering any type of drugs including headache tablets and antibiotics. Please ensure that you are adequately prepared.

ALTITUDE SICKNESS
Parts of your trip go above 2800 metres / 9200 feet where it is common for travellers to experience some adverse health effects due to the altitude - regardless of your age, gender and fitness.

BEFORE YOUR TRIP.
Some pre-existing medical conditions are known to severely worsen at high altitude and be difficult to adequately treat on the ground, leading to more serious consequences. It is imperative that you discuss your pre-existing medical condition/s with your doctor. We understand certain medications are reported to aid acclimatizing to high altitude. Please discuss these options with your doctor.
During your trip.
While our leaders have basic first aid training and are aware of the closest medical facilities, it is very important that you are aware of the cause and effects of travelling at altitude, monitor your health and seek assistance accordingly.

WHO – WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
The World Health Organization has identified the following mosquito transmitted diseases in this region:
Dengue, Yellow Fever, Malaria and Zika (amongst others)

YELLOW FEVER.
A valid international certificate of vaccination against Yellow Fever is required in many countries. You may need to present this on arrival at the airport or border crossing. Some countries will refuse entry if you are unable to present your certificate. It's also quite common for your home country to request a Yellow Fever certificate on your arrival back home.
It is your responsibility to check with your doctor well in advance of leaving home about the Yellow Fever requirements for the countries you'll be visiting.

ZIKA VIRUS.
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there has been an outbreak of the mosquito-borne Zika virus in parts of Central and South America. This virus is mostly concerning to pregnant women as recently in Brazil local authorities have linked the virus to an increase in babies born with microcephaly (smaller than normal skull).
In addition to the risk mentioned above WHO have reported that Zika symptoms may include mild fever, skin rash and conjunctivitis. These symptoms normally last for 2-7 days.
In line with the above, we recommend all women who are pregnant or trying to get pregnant to consult with their doctors before booking their trip to Central and South America. At this stage, WHO is not recommending any travel or trade restrictions related to the Zika virus  

FOOD AND DIETARY REQUIREMENT
While travelling with us you'll experience the vast array of wonderful Peruvian food available in this region. Your group leader will be able to suggest restaurants to try during your trip. To give you the maximum flexibility in deciding where, what and with whom to eat, generally not all meals are included in the trip price. This also gives you more budgeting flexibility. As a rule our groups tend to eat dinner together to enable you to taste a larger variety of dishes and enjoy each other's company. There's no obligation to do this though.

DIETARY REQUIREMENTS.
Please let us know your diet requirements before your trip starts.
Generally speaking, in bigger cities/towns vegetarians can expect a reasonable range of vegetarian venues and/or vegetarian options within tourist restaurant menus. However, vegetarianism is not the norm in this part of the world so options can be limited when eating at homestays, small local restaurants, street stalls, markets, etc.
More restrictive diet requirements (vegans, celiac, gluten intolerance, fructose intolerance, lactose intolerance, etc.) can also be accommodated along this trip but you should expect a lesser variety than what you can expect at home. We recommend that, if possible, to bring your own supply of snacks with you.

SIMPLE BREAKFAST.
Some of the included breakfasts along this trip can be quite simple (continental style): toasts, spreads, juice and coffee or tea.

ACCOMMODATION.
Rolo’s travel Peru accommodations are. Camping (with basic facilities), Homestays, Hotels 3 to 4 starts, Jungle Lodges.
Due to limited time and energy supply in some places, please be prepared for some cold showers.
The style of accommodation is indicated in the itinerary is a guideline. On rare occasions, alternative arrangements may need to be made due to the lack of availability of rooms in our usual accommodation. A similar standard of accommodation will be used in these instances.
Throughout the trip we request that our lodgings prepare rooms in time for our arrival, especially if we're arriving prior to normal check-in time. However this isn't always possible which means we won't be able to check-in immediately on arrival at some hotels. Instead, we can store our luggage and explore our new destination.
If you've purchased pre-trip or post-trip accommodation (if available), you may be required to change rooms from your trip accommodation for these extra nights.

HOMESTAYS.
As a responsible travel company, we believe in facilitating positive and meaningful exchanges between our travellers and locals at the places we visit. Homestays are a great vehicle for us to facilitate the life time experience of the local life style.
What will you do during a homestay? Well…it’s hard to tell. As you know a day in a family’s life varies from day to day. We don’t want this experience to feel forced (on you or on them) so we ask families to simply carry on with their lives and that, if there is anything that you may be interested in being part of, they ask you to join in. As such you may be invited to help cook dinner, or to go to the local market for groceries, or to join a soccer game with the kids! While your leader will give you some tools to interact with your family (such as some simple words/phrases in Quechua and/or Spanish) big smiles and lots of sign language can go a long way. 
In terms of facilities, the rooms are clean and comfortable (or as comfortable as they get in this part of the world!) however quite basic. Plenty of blankets are provided. Ask for more if you are cold. Layering up with thin thermals and a fleece material will help during very cold nights too.

TRANSPORT.
RTP. Tours runs with several transports such as. Plane, Taxi, Public bus, Private Vehicle, Canoe, Boat, Train.

MONEY MATTERS.
When it comes to money matters on the trip, every traveller is a little different. You know your spending habits better than we do, so please budget a sensible amount for things like drinks, shopping, optional activities, tipping and laundry. It’s always better to bring a little more than you think you’ll need. Also make sure you’ve read your trip details thoroughly so you know what’s included in the trip price and what isn’t. This should make budgeting a little easier. You’ll find this info in the Inclusions section of your Essential Trip Information (that’s this document). 
The recommended amounts are listed in USD for the relatability of universal travellers, however the local currency is needed in the countries you are visiting.

CONTINGENCY FUNDS.
We try to plan for every eventuality, but there are still some things beyond our control. Please make sure you have access to the equivalent of an extra US$500 for emergencies (e.g. severe weather, natural disasters, civil unrest) or other events that result in unavoidable changes to the itinerary (e.g. transport strikes or cancellations, airport closures). Sometimes these things necessitate last minute changes to enable our trips to continue to run, and as a result there may be some extra costs involved.

MEALS NOT INCLUDED.
For this trip we recommend between USD 25 to 50 per day. How do we work this out?
Breakfast - If breakfast is not included, you can expect to pay between USD5 to USD10 at a local café.
Lunch - If you are happy with a quick snack on the go, you may get away with as little as USD5 to USD10 for a set menu at a local eatery or a sandwich and a drink at a café. On the other hand, a lunch meal at a more tourist restaurant can cost between USD10 to USD15.
Dinner - At dinner time, your leader will normally recommend restaurants where you can safely try the local specialties of the region. Expect meals to cost between USD12 to USD25 for a main.
These are indicative prices only. If you are in a tight budget, are happy to eat just local food and are not afraid of an upset tummy every now and then, you can eat cheaper than this. If you want to try just the finest food at the finest restaurants, then you can expect meals to cost as much as in western countries.

CREDIT CARDS and ATMs.
ATMs are widely available in major towns and cities across Latin America. Credit cards are generally available in tourist shops and restaurants. Visa and Mastercard are generally preferred over American Express, Diners, etc. Smaller venues take cash only.
Check with your bank before departure that your card is accepted in the countries you are travelling to and what their fees and charges are. Also ensure your bank is aware of your travel plans as - suspecting fraud - they may cancel your cards after the first few international transactions. Be aware that your withdrawing limit may vary from country to country (regardless of your withdrawing limit in your home country) and it can be as low as the equivalent to USD100 per day.
If bringing over cash, please note USD100 bills with serial number CB or BE and any other USD bills that are old, torn, written or stamped on will not be accepted by local banks.

DEPARTURE TAX.
In most countries you must pay an airport departure tax. Nowadays, these departure taxes are added into the cost of your airline tickets and paid for at the time of purchase.
Unless mentioned below, no airport departure tax has to be paid during this trip.

TIPPING.
Gratuities aren’t compulsory on your trip, but they can make a big difference to locals employed in the tourism industry. We suggest carrying small notes of local currency around as you go. It’ll make tipping easier. The recommended tipping amounts are listed in USD for the relatability of universal travellers.
Usually around USD5 – USD12 a day to cover tips is fine, but your leader might raise the idea of a group tip kitty. Each traveller contributes an equal amount to the pool, and your leader can pay the tips as you go.

Peru - General Tipping Guide:

To give you a bit of guidance, we’ve put together the following tipping notes. These are just suggestions, based on feedback from past travellers and our staff on the ground.

Restaurants: Local markets and basic restaurants - round your bill up to the nearest USD1. More up-market restaurants we suggest 10% to 15% of your bill.

Local guides: There might be times during the trip where you’ll have a specialist local guide alongside your trip leader. We suggest tipping these guides about USD4 – USD5 per day.

Drivers: You may have a range of drivers on your trip. Some may be with you for a short journey while others may be with you for several days. We suggest USD1-USD2 per day for drivers.

Your Tour Leader: You may also consider tipping your tour leader for outstanding service throughout your trip. The amount is entirely a personal preference, however as a guideline USD5-USD8 per person, per day can be used. Of course you are free to tip more or less as you see fit, depending on your perception of service quality and the length of your trip. Remember, a tip is not compulsory and should only be given when you receive excellent service.

Peru Trekking - General Tipping Guide.

We recommend you carry the below suggested amounts with you during the trek and that you carry small bills as this makes splitting the tip an easier process. The last day of the trek the tipping will be broken down into envelopes one per porter, guide, assistain gruide, cook, assistain cook 

Inca Trail: While on the Inca Trail we suggest a total tipping amount of PEN150 to PEN220 per person (approximately USD 52 to USD 74). This is generally the tipping breakdown.
Porters, cook and assistants PEN 120 to PEN 150
Assistant guide: PEN 15 to PEN 22
Guide: PEN 35 to PEN 45

Alternative Treks: For all Alternative Treks the suggested total tipping amount per person is PEN 150 to PEN 250 (approximately USD 52 to USD 85). This is will vary depend of how many days while on the trek generally the tipping breakdown
Porters or Horsemans, cook and assistants PEN 100 to PEN 120
Assistant guide: PEN 10 to PEN 15
Guide: PEN 30 to PEN 40

PACKING

What you need to bring will vary according to the trip style you have chosen, the countries you are visiting and when you are travelling. Generally speaking you should pack as lightly as possible. 
Most travellers carry their luggage in a backpack, although a small to medium suitcase with wheels is ok too. Whatever you take, be mindful that you will need to be able to carry your own luggage, handle it at airports, take in/out of accommodation and perhaps even short walking distances.
In terms of weight, keep in mind that if you are flying domestically (either on this itinerary or during your personal time) airlines generally allow a maximum of 23kg for check in luggage plus 8 kg of carryon luggage. 
Finally, you'll also need a day pack/bag to carry water and a camera etc. for day trip.

PACKING LIST.

  • Travel documents: Original passport, visa (if required), travel insurance, air tickets or e-ticket receipts and a copy of this document 
  • Photocopy of main passport pages, visa (if required), travel insurance and air tickets
  • Money: cash/credit card/EFTPOS card
  • Money belt and small padlocks
  • Personal medication
  • Daypack
  • Watch/Alarm clock or phone that can be used for both
  • Torch/flashlight (your phone’s may suffice)
  • Electrical adapter plug universal  
  • Toiletries/travel wipes
  • Insect repellent
  • Sunscreen, lip balm, sunhat and sunglasses
  • Earplugs and eye mask (you might be sharing with a snorer!)
  • Refillable water bottle
  • Phrase book
  • Warm clothes including hat and gloves - When travelling in cooler climates
  • Wind and waterproof rain jacket
  • Travel Towel
  • Comfortable and sturdy walking shoes with good walking socks
  • Camera with spare memory card and charger/batteries
  • Swimwear (dependent on itinerary)
  • Emergency fund as mentioned in the Money Matters section
  • Clothes! Bear in mind that laundry facilities are widely available throughout this trip. The cost varies between USD2 to USD4 (approx.) per kilo and it can normally be dropped off and picked the same day.

SLEEPING BAGS.
It’s not essential that you bring a sleeping bag for any of our trips however on some itineraries we will recommend either bringing one from home or hiring one on the ground. If this is the case it will be mentioned in the ‘region specific’ packing list.

SPECIFIC AMAZON PACKING LIST.
In addition to the packing list above we recommend bringing the following items if visiting the Amazon Jungle.

  • Tight-weave, light coloured, long cotton pants
  • Long sleeved, tight-weave, light coloured cotton shirts
  • Comfortable shoes or sandles for wearing on boardwalks or around the lodge
  • Knee high rubber boots are provided for the duration of your stay, we recommend wearing these for the jungle walks. Please bring Thick/long socks to wear with the rubber boots
  • Rain Jacket or poncho
  • Tropical strength Insect repellent
  • Small denomination bills for beverages
  • Small day pack to for day excursions
  • Good binoculars (optional)
  • Head torch or flash light (smart phone torch sufficient)
  • Luggage is hand-carried at various stages in the trip for long distance. We strongly recommend you limit your weight to 15 kilos (32 pounds per piece).

TREK PACKING LIST
Tents and sleeping mats are provided for the duration of your Peru trek.
At the pre-trek briefing you will be given a small duffle bag to pack your personal items for the trek, please note there is a 6kg limited weight for the Inca Trail or denpend the tour you’ll booked, this weight includes your sleeping bag.
In addition to the general packing list above, please ensure you bring these items if you are trekking in Peru.
Passport.
You MUST take your passport, a photocopy is not sufficient. It's important the passport matches the details you provided us when booking this trip (Keep it in a plastic bag in case of rain)
Sleeping bag.
You will need a good warm sleeping bag for the trek. Sleeping bags can be hired for US20-25, please let your Tour Leader know at the trek briefing. A four plus season (or -10) bag is recommended especially for the winter months. At other times you will probably be fine in a 3 or 4 season (or -5) bag although this depends on how much you feel the cold and is given as a guideline only, in adition we suggest you bring a sleeping bag liner.
Pillow.
Pillows are not provided on the trek and it's your personal preference if you wish to bring one along. If you decide to bring a pillow then we do suggest packing a travel friendly option, something that can be easily packed into your small duffle bag.
Trek Poles.
Trek poles are not requires, it's a personal preference, but some of our treks really requires all depend which trek areyou going to. We recommend hiring these at the pre-trek briefing for approximately US$10 per pole as it will save you carting them around for the remainder of your travels.
Day Pack.
A day bag that has easy access to water bottles (external side pockets) or a day pack with a built in hydration bladder. This bag only needs to be large enough to hold the few things you need during the day (hat, water, camera, snacks, rain jacket etc)
Water bottle.
You should be carrying at least 2 litres of water daily, while trekking. Depending on whether you have a hydration bladder in your bag or not we recommend bringing two (1 litre) bottles that can be refilled on the trail with boiled water, which will be supplied daily.
Waterproof, well worn-in walking boots.
Good quality, comfortable footwear is essential. Whatever you wear on your feet the most important thing is comfort. It is vital to ensure your boots are well worn in and lightweight. Ankle support and waterproofing is recommended but if you already have something comfortable with good grip on rocks then don’t go rushing out to buy new boots – you are better off with your well-worn in pair!
Walking clothing in layers.
(E.g. zip off trousers, fleece, T-shirts). It’s a personal choice as to how many items you bring however please remember there’s a weight limit. We recommend the following;

  • 2 or 3 Pairs of long Walking Trousers (Zip off are a very hand  choice but not a necessity)
  • 2 or 3 T-shirts
  • 1 Pair of shorts
  • Rain Jacket or Poncho (Poncho can be purchased locally  for a $2-3)
  • 4 or 5 Pairs of Thick socks

Warm clothing for night time.
Fleece, long pants, woollen hat, gloves, downnjacket
Thermal underwear
Sunscreen, sunglasses and sunhat
Personal medication and basic first aid kit: 
Band-Aids, Imodium, Panadol, rehydration sachets.
Camera and spare batteries, memory cards or film: 
Please note: there are no electrical outlets on the trek so make sure you fully charge and or have spare batteries.
Snacks.
Chocolates, chips, biscuits, energy bars. Snacks are provided during the trek but you may like to bring one or two extras just in case. If you have a dietary requirement then be recommend bringing some suitable snacks from home. We will accommodate you for Breakfast, lunch and dinner however for snacks it’s recommended to bring some just to be safe.
Head torch or Standard Torch (flash-light) 
(Very Important) and spare batteries.
Tropical strength insect repellent.
Antiseptic hand gel.
Flip-flops / thongs / jandals
Ear Plugs
In case your ‘roomie’ is a snorer.
Plastic bags: 
To keep your belongings and clothes dry (wrap everything in plastic bags).
Toilet paper: 
Most important! Also small plastic bags or zip lock bags for rubbish which can then be thrown in the main rubbish bag. Please don’t dispose of your toilet paper on the ground!
Wet wipes and or Face wipes.
These are an essential and will come in handy after a long day of travelling or trekking

GROUP LEADER.
All Rolo’s Travel Peru group trips are accompanied by one of our group leaders. The aim of the group leader is to take the hassle out of your travels and to help you have the best trip possible. RTP, endeavours to provide the services of an experienced leader however, due to the seasonality of travel, rare situations may arise where your leader is new to a particular region or training other group leaders.
Your leader will provide information on the places you are travelling through, offer suggestions for things to do and see, recommend great local eating venues and introduce you to our local friends. While not being guides in the traditional sense you can expect them to have a broad general knowledge of the places visited on the trip, including historical, cultural, religious and social aspects. At RTP we aim to support local guides who have specialised knowledge of the regions we visit. If you were interested in delving deeper into the local culture at a specific site or location then your leader can recommend a local guide service in most of the main destinations of your trip.

SAFETY.
Many national governments provide a regularly updated advice service on safety issues involved with international travel. We recommend that you check your government's advice for their latest travel information before departure and ensure that your travel insurance covers you for all areas your itinerary covers.
We strongly recommend the use of a neck wallet or money belt while travelling, for the safe-keeping of your passport, air tickets, cash and other valuable items. Leave your valuable jewellery at home - you won't need it while travelling. Many of our hotels have safety deposit boxes, which is the most secure way of storing your valuables. A lock is recommended for securing your luggage.
Your leader will accompany you on all included activities, however during your trip you'll have some free time to pursue your own interests, relax and take it easy or explore at your leisure. While your leader will assist you with the available options in a given location, please note that any optional activities you undertake are not part of your Rolo’s Travel Peru’s itinerary, and RTP makes no representations about the safety of the activity or the standard of the operators running them. Please use your own good judgement when selecting an activity in your free time. Please also note that your Leader has the authority to amend or cancel any part of the trip itinerary if it's deemed necessary due to safety concerns.

HIKING IN PERU.
In accordance with local laws governing tourism in Peru, trekking groups of up to and including 8 trekkers will be led by one local guide. The evacuation of an injured traveller in normal conditions may take more than 8 hours or so. For your own safety, it's crucial that you adhere to the local guide's safety instructions, particularly in regard to how to prevent trekkers getting separated or lost. Your leader will also conduct a brief safety discussion before our trekking activity.

PETTY THEFT AND PERSONAL SAFETY.
While travelling there is always the risk of pick-pocketing and petty theft, particularly in the more touristy cities. We recommend that you exercise caution when walking alone at night and encourage you to walk together and only on main, well-lit thoroughfares. Be particularly vigilant on public transport. Simple measures like carrying your day pack on your front, not hanging your bag over the back of your chair or on the floor and wearing a money belt will reduce any chance that your valuables should go missing.

MONEY WITHDRAWAL.
In order to avoid fraud, it is advisable that you withdraw money from ATMs located inside banks or guarded shops during business hours only.

TRAFFIC AND DRIVING ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE ROAD.
Depending on where you come from please note that drivers in this part of the world may drive on the opposite side of the road from what you are used to. Look both ways before crossing any road. Traffic can be a little more chaotic than you might be used to at home. Be aware

SEAT BELTS.
Please be aware that local laws governing transportation safety may differ from those in your home country and not all the transport which we use is able to provide seat belts.

LIFE JACKETS.
While life jackets are generally available on water craft, there may be occasions where they are not provided and child size life jackets are not always readily available. If travelling with children and this safety issue concerns you we will be able to advise alternative methods of transport.

FIRE PRECAUTIONS.
Please be aware that local laws governing tourism facilities in this region differ from those in your home country and not all the accommodation which we use has a fire exit, fire extinguishers or smoke alarms.

LIMA AIRPORT WARNING.
For safety reasons, we strongly recommend that during transfers in Lima all of your luggage, including hand luggage and valuables, is stored out of sight in the rear boot of the vehicle.

IMPORTANT RULES.
Everyone has the right to feel safe when they travel. We don’t tolerate any form of violence (verbal or physical) or sexual harassment, either between customers or involving our leaders, partners or local people. Sexual relationships between a tour leader and a customer are strictly forbidden.
Use or possession of illegal drugs will not be tolerated on our trips. If you choose to consume alcohol while travelling, we encourage responsible drinking, and expect that you’ll abide by the local laws regarding alcohol consumption.
By travelling with us you are agreeing to adhere to these rules. Your group leader has the right to remove any member of the group for breaking any of these rules, with no right of refund.

TRAVELLING ON A GROUP TRIP.
As you travel on a group trip you will be exposed to all the pleasures and maybe some of the frustrations of travelling in a group. Your fellow travellers will probably come from all corners of the world and likely a range of age groups too. We ask you to be understanding of the various needs and preferences of your group - patience with your fellow travellers is sometimes required for the benefit of everyone's travel experience.

SINGLE TRAVELLERS.
Our group trips are designed for shared accommodation and don't involve a compulsory single supplement. Single travellers share with people of the same gender in accommodation ranging from twin to multishare. You have the option to pay a single supplement to ensure that you have your own accommodation (where available). Please note that this only applies to accommodation during the tour - pre-trip and post-trip accommodation will be booked on a single room basis.

TRAVEL INSURANCE.
Travel insurance is compulsory for all our trips. We require that, at a minimum, you are covered for medical expenses including emergency repatriation. We strongly recommend that the policy also covers personal liability, cancellation, curtailment and loss of luggage and personal effects.
When travelling on a trip, you won't be permitted to join the group until evidence of travel insurance and the insurance company's 24 hour emergency contact number has been seen by your leader.
If you have credit card insurance your group leader will require details of the participating insurer/underwriter, the level of coverage, policy number and emergency contact number rather than the bank's name and credit card details. Please contact your bank for these details prior to arriving in-country.

RESPONSIBLE TRAVEL.
We believe strongly in low impact or rather positive impact tourism. Broadly speaking this means that we try to minimise the negative aspects of tourism on the local cultures and environments that we visit and highlight the positive aspects.
Latin Americans can be very conscious of appearance so try to be casual but conservative in your dress. Outside of beach areas halter tops and very short shorts should not be worn. When visiting churches or religious sites shoulders and knees should be covered.

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